GOLD PRICE

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WHERE THE WORLD CHECKS THE GOLD PRICE

Calculators

Current Gold Holdings

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Future Gold Price

Current Silver Holdings

$

Future Silver Price

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Note: Please wait 60 seconds for updates to the calculators to apply.

Display the values of the calculator in page header for quick reference.

The Holdings Calculator permits you to calculate the current value of your gold and silver.

  • Enter a number Amount in the left text field.
  • Select Ounce, Gram or Kilogram for the weight.
  • Select a Currency. NOTE: You must select a currency for gold first, even if you don't enter a value for gold holdings. If you wish to select a currency other than USD for the Silver holdings calculator.

The current price per unit of weight and currency will be displayed on the right. The Current Value for the amount entered is shown.

Optionally enter number amounts for Purchase Price and/or Future Value per unit of weight chosen.

The Current and Future Gain/Loss will be calculated.

Totals for Gold and Silver holdings including the ratio percent of gold versus silver will be calculated.

The spot price of Gold per Troy Ounce and the date and time of the price is shown below the calculator.

If your browser is configured to accept Cookies you will see a button at the bottom of the Holdings Calculator.

Pressing the button will place a cookie on your machine containing the information you entered into the Holdings Calculator.

When you return to goldprice.org the cookie will be retrieved from your machine and the values placed into the calculator.

A range of other useful gold and silver calculators can be found on our Calculators page

Gold Price Calculators

Spot Gold Price Charts Update Every Minute Automatically.

Share this spot gold price or spot silver price chart by adding the html code on the gold price charts for your websites page. You may modify the html code as long as a text link to goldprice.org remains from the words "gold price" somewhere on each page that displays the charts.

This page displays charts of the current price of gold, otherwise known as the spot gold price. The spot gold price refers to the price at which gold may be bought and sold right now, as opposed to a date in the future. The spot price for gold is in a constant state of flux, and can be driven by many different factors. The spot gold price can refer to the current price of gold per ounce, gram or kilo. Typically, however, spot gold is quoted in price per ounce using U.S. Dollars. Quotes are also available depicting the spot gold price in other currencies as well. Spot gold price charts can be useful for identifying trends in the gold market, or for looking for areas of support and resistance to buy or sell at. Charts can be viewed using multiple timeframes depending on your objectives. A long-term gold investor will likely be most concerned with weekly, monthly and yearly charts while a short-term hedger may be more concerned with daily, hourly or even 5 minute charts.

What Determines the Spot Gold Price?

The simplest answer is the law of supply and demand. If buyers are trying to buy gold, sellers may lift prices causing buyers to bid higher. On the other hand, if sellers are overwhelming buyers, those looking to acquire gold may bid lower, thus driving prices down in the process. Of course, spot gold prices can be affected by many inputs that influence the supply/demand equation. The actual spot price of gold is derived from the nearest month gold futures contract with the most volume. This could be the nearest month, or front month, or it could be a month or two out on the time horizon.

What are Some of the Factors That Drive Spot Gold Prices?

Gold is not only bought as an investment, but it is also bought for use in other areas such as industry and jewelry making. The potential influences on the spot price are extensive, but the following list names some of the major ones:

  • Investment demand
  • Jewelry demand
  • Currency markets
  • Inflation or deflation
  • Interest rates and/or monetary policy
  • Risk aversion or appetite
  • Geopolitics
  • Equity markets

Gold can potentially see stronger investment demand during periods of economic or geopolitical stress. For example, spot gold may potentially move higher during times of war or geopolitical unrest. From an economic standpoint, gold may potentially see increased buying from a stock market collapse or bear market. Interest rates and monetary policy can also have a significant effect on the spot gold price. Gold may potentially benefit during periods of ultra-low interest rates, as low rates make the opportunity cost of holding gold less. On the other hand, gold may potentially come under pressure as interest rates rise, due to the fact that gold does not offer any dividend or interest for holding it. Currency markets are another major driver of the spot gold price. Although gold is traded all over the globe, it is often denominated in dollars. As the dollar rises, it makes gold relatively more expensive for foreign buyers and may potentially cause declines in the spot price. On the other hand, a weaker dollar may potentially make gold relatively less expensive for foreign investors, and can potentially cause spot gold prices to rise.

Are Spot Gold Prices the Same Everywhere?

Gold is traded and used all over the world for investment purposes, jewelry making and as a medium of exchange. Because an ounce of gold is the same whether it is in the U.S. or in Japan, the spot gold price is theoretically the same everywhere. Of course, differing currency values can have an effect on gold as well, and dealer premiums can also vary. Using the spot price of gold, the yellow metal can be bought anywhere using any currency. For example, if the spot price of gold is $1100 per ounce and you were looking to buy gold in Japan, you could figure out the necessary currency conversion to buy gold using Japanese Yen. Gold is traded all over the world, and thus its price is always on the move. Some of the major hubs for gold trading include the U.S., London, Zurich, India and more. The spot gold market is essentially always open, as markets follow the sun. Keep in mind that gold is typically bought for a premium over spot and sold at a discount to spot.